The team is led by Prof Jonathan Aitchison. The Tectonics and Biostratigraphy research group thrive on collaborative research, both nationally and internationally. If you have any quires about this group please contact Sarah at s.kachovich@uq.edu.au


GROUP COORDINATOR

Prof. Jonathan Aitchison      

ACADEMIC STAFF

 

Dr. Gayane Asatryan             g.asatryan@uq.edu.au

 

Dr. Renjie Zhou                renjie.zhou@uq.edu.au

 

PhD/Masters Candidates

Sarah Kachovich                   s.kachovich@uq.edu.au  

 

Lulu He                                 l.he@uq.edu.au

 

Denis Stojanovic                   d.stojanovic@uq.edu.au

 

VISITING OVERSEAS STUDENTS

Xianqing Guo                       x.guo@uq.edu.au

Australian Collaborators

Dr. Solomon Buckman         solomon@uow.edu.au                (University of Wollongong)   

Prof. Geoffrey Clarke            geoffrey.clarke@sydney.edu.au   (University of Sydney)

Prof. Trevor Ireland              Trevor.Ireland@anu.edu.au        (Australian National University)

overseas collaborators

Dr. Paula Noble                    noblepj@unr.edu                       (University of Nevada Reno, USA)    

Prof. Danelian Taniel            taniel.danelian@univ-lille1.fr     (Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 1,  France)

Prof. Yan Zhen                      yanzhen@mail.iggcas.ac.cn        (Institute of Geology, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, China)

Dr. Jason Ali                          jrali@hku.hk                             (University of Hong Kong, China)

Dr. Noritoshi Suzuki             suzuki.noritoshi@nifty.com       (Tohoku University, Japan)

Dr. Aliba Ao                          ao.ali6@Gmail.com                   (Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India)

Prof. Santauu Bhowmik         santanu@gg.iitkgp.ernet.in        (Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India)

Dr. Kapesa Lokho                  kapesamao@rediffmail.com       (Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology, India)

Dr. A. Krishnakanta Singh    aksingh_wihg@rediffmail.com   (Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology, India)

Ladahk fieldwork guide Jigmet Lee Punchok, Leh city, India.  Contact  +91 94690 18586

          

 

Professor Jonathan Aitchison

Professor and Head of School, School of Geography Planning and Environmental Management, The University of Queensland

Jonathan

QUALIFICATIONS

  • PhD, University of New England
  • MSc, University of Otago  
  • BSc Hons, University of Otago

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Jonathan's research interests include: evolution of the Himalaya and Tibet-Qinghai Plateau and surrounding regions on a variety of time scales; tectonics, collision zones especially those involving intra-oceanic island arcs and ophiolites, subduction initiation, the India-Asia collision; the Yarlung Tsangpo, Indus, Bangong-Nujiang and Shyok suture zones, climatic evolution of Tibet, the evolution of life on Earth, biogeography and extremophile organisms, radiolarian paleoecology and biostratigraphy, the tectonic evolution of East Asia and the tectonic evolution of eastern Australia through the Phanerozoic and island biogeography and the complex interplay between Darwinian biological evolution, and eustatic and subsidence driven sea-level change especially in the Galapagos.

E-mail: jona@uq.edu.au


Dr Gayane Asatryan

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, School of Geography Planning and Environmental Management, The University of Queensland

Gayane

QUALIFICATIONS

Ph.D , University Pierre and Marie Curie

RESEARCH INTERESTS

The main objective of Gayane's research projects until now has been to date, by means of radiolarian biostratigraphy, radiolarites that are in stratigraphic contact with ophiolitic lavas, providing in this way important time constraints for opening and spreading of the various parts of the Mesozoic Tethyan oceanic realm. Radiolarian biostratigraphy is invaluable for understanding the geodynamic and palaeoenvironmental evolution of the Tethyan realms.

Gayane's current research focuses on early Palaeozoic radiolarian biostratigraphy, paleogeography and paleoceanography. With the aim to develop an understanding of radiolarian biostratigraphy, phylogenetic relationships, and taxonomy by using 3D micro-CT techniques to observe radiolarian's complex structural details and skeletal evolution. Research areas include Late Ordovician from Cliefden Caves, NSW and Middle Cambrian from the Georgina Basin, Australia.

E-mail: g.asatryan@uq.edu.au


Dr Renjie Zhou

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, School of Geography Planning and Environmental Management, The University of Queensland

QUALIFICATIONS

Ph.D, University of Toronto

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Renjie is interested in learning how and why mountain belts and sedimentary basins may have evolved through geologic time. He uses a range of field, laboratory and numerical approaches, particularly including field mapping, structural geology, basin analysis, and multisystem thermo-/geochronology.

Webpage: rzhou.com; E-mail: renjie.zhou@uq.edu.au


Sarah Kachovich

Ph.D candidate, School of Geography Planning and Environmental Management, The University of Queensland

Sarah

QUALIFICATIONS

BSc. (Hons), University of Wollongong

PROJECT

Applied radiolarian biostratigraphy in the Australasian region and investigations of the early radiation and diversification of the phylum radiolarian using 3D microtomographic analysis

Radiolarians form an important part of the early Palaeozoic (530-350 Ma) planktonic realm. However, their origins and evolutionary development still elude us. This is in large part due to the absence of organic remains. Understanding their evolutionary patterns, phylogenetic relationships and the taxonomy relies on our ability to observe complete structural details. The classical technique in determining the age of deep marine sediments using radiolarian biostratigahphy has huge potential to resolve many long-standing tectonic problems and is applicable to similar systems globally. This method has been used to constrain the timescale of processes involved in the formation of ophiolites, which adds understanding to the evolution of collision systems, in particular the opening and spreading of the various parts of the Mesozoic Tethyan, oceanic realm.

Sarah uses classical methodologies to make a contribution of global significance, and also explores new 3D micro-CT technology to elucidate skeletal architecture evolution that will help to unlock the biostratigraphic potential of Early Palaeozoic (roughly 470 Ma) radiolarians. Advances in 3-D X-ray imaging technology finally present us with an opportunity to make observations at sufficient resolution in a non-destructive manner.

Email:  s.kachovich@uq.edu.au


Lulu He

Ph.D candidate, School of Geography Planning and Environmental management, The University of Queensland

Lulu

QUALIFICATIONS

BA, MA, Sichuan University

PROJECT

The role of displacement in building resilience after earthquakes in Himalaya-Tibet area

The Himalaya-Tibet area lies in the collision zone between continental crust of the Indian and Eurasian plates. This area experiences acute seismicity: several recent earthquakes over Mw7.0 have occurred in the area in the past decade. Research suggests that this area is expected to experience further great earthquakes in the future. Due to their terrestrial causes and catastrophic aftermath, earthquakes are different from other natural disasters, always causing destructive damage to people lives, which commonly requires tens of years to recover and reestablish stable living circumstances. Since earthquakes are not controllable, moving residential sites is considered as a helpful tool for evading further risks in earthquake-struck areas and as a first step to re-establish living circumstances.

Lulu's project probes the effects of residential move after strong earthquakes in the Himalaya-Tibet area: April 25, 2015 Gorkha earthquake in Nepal and May 12, 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in China. There are three main parts to this research:1) The government’s role in relocation since it is the government that implements relocation plan for the victims; 2) earthquake-induced vulnerabilities for the victims; and 3) the good and bad functions of relocation. Participant observation, focus group interviews and questionnaire survey will be employed to collect data, with SPSS, NVivo and GIS used to analyse and display the data.

Email: l.he@uq.edu.au


Denis Stojanovic

Ph.D candidate, School of Geography Planning and Environmental management, The University of Queensland

Denis

QUALIFICATIONS

BSc (Hons), BA, University of Sydney

PROJECT

Palaeomagnetic investigation of the India-Asia Suture Zone and insights into subduction initiation

Denis' research will seek to obtain new primary palaeomagnetic data from basaltic rocks found along the India-Asia suture zone through the Indian and Tibetan Himalaya. These data may then be used in conjunction with biostratigraphic and radiometric datasets from the same region to test and refine models of subduction initiation during India-Asian collision, which may serve as a model for subduction processes in general. The primary aim of Denis' project is to contribute to a wider study to determine how the fundamental plate tectonic process of subduction is initiated.

In building a multi-disciplinary dataset, an attempt will be made to address primary aspects of subduction initiation by testing competing hypotheses describing scenarios of subduction processes that began within the Neotethyan Ocean. Using the India-Asia suture as a case study for the development of a single subduction system, the project outcomes will advance the global knowledge base for Earth Sciences by allowing critical assessment of influential models proposed both for subduction initiation and ophiolite generation.

Email: d.stojanovic@uq.edu.au